Air · Burqaa · hijab · Hijabi · Kuwait · Saudi · Uncategorized

A face in the crowd 

In my way to Kuwait, I thought to look like a real Saudi by covering half of my face (just for the picture). 

Have you ever seen women who cover their faces or half of their faces (by wearing burqa’a) around you? 

Please Tell me how you feel when you see that. 

Why?

Because most people when they know how you look at them, they start to understand your point of view. They will be familiar with your point of view towards life. Such familiarity creates comfort. 

So, will you be kind enough as to answer my question? 🙂

 

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47 thoughts on “A face in the crowd 

  1. That’s a good question–I hope you get plenty of answers.

    As an American living in a military town, I feel bad for them because I know they are treated poorly here. And then I feel good that I can treat them as human beings, and show them that not everyone here immediately judges them for their clothing.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I am an Indian…and I don’t have a problem with whatever one is wearing…but in a recent incidence one of my friend was wearing burqa while our way back to college.. I asked generally why do you wear this????
    She replied.. It helps in protecting me and moreover My husband gets to see me ….I don’t want to show off others…..
    No hard feelings but these reasons sound stupid to me…..One should be allowed to wear whatever they want according to their faith unquestionably but claiming that girls who aren’t wearing naqab are showing off themselves is just idiotic……

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I always feel that women who wear burqa are beautiful women. I say this because back when I was a teenager I had a lot of acquaintances who wear it and most of them are Brazilian, and they’re really beautiful. Actually, that’s when I started believing that a woman does not need to show too much skin to look beautiful, the eyes can do that already. In addition, I feel that it symbolizes faith and obedience. But that’s just me.. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Honestly, living in the UK near London, there is such a diverse range of people walking the streets that seeing women covering their faces in this way doesn’t bother me one bit. I rarely notice as it is just the norm here. I know there are some unpleasant people around who sometimes comment on this but it has never bothered me and I believe everyone should be able to wear what they want.
    The thing I do take issue with is that I have come across women fully covered at college once who refused to talk to anyone else but other women of their ‘own kind’- I don’t mean to offend with this term. I couldn’t break a conversation with them even though we were supposed to work together in a team (I’m a woman also and don’t dress in a provoking way) so I don’t know what it was that was so bad about talking to me. 😦

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thehappymeerkat, I’m so glad you commented with that. I’m sure there’s nothing bad about talking to you.
      Yes, some women feel more comfortable working with who may appear to similar “similar” to them. They have different reasons one of which could be bad English to communicate with. Or they could be shy. Some may feel they are superior and their opinions can be better exchanged with ones of “their own kind.”
      What I know is, women who fully cover prefer to talk with women. Regardless of how those women look like. I didn’t know they would go further and choose the kind of women they talk with. This is new info. So thanks for sharing!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Hello I’m very pleased that you asked that question so kindly. I would like to answer you and respond to some of the other comments on this post.
    I want to first address this idea that hijab an burqa is simply to preserve our beauty for our husbands and to “not show off” because it’s not. It so much more than that. As a Muslim living in the states wearing hijab and abaya I don’t believe that girls who don’t dress like this are showing off or are immodest. Hijab and burqa isn’t just covering up, it’s supposed to be in our character, our manners. Hijab is not for our husbands or husbands to be its for Allah swt, it’s an act of faith and love submitting to him and him alone. Hijab humbles me. It’s so that people look beyond our bodies, beyond our beauty and look at our character, our intellect. And yes it does to an extent protect us from the evils in the world, but let me clarify our prophet PBUH told men to lower their gaze REGARDLESS of what the woman was wearing BEFORE it was told for us to cover.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Noshinobokth thanks a lot for your comment. You’re right about how hijab should be a way to show service to God and Him alone. Hijab isn’t supposed to be a means where hijabs look down on those who don’t cover, but let’s face it, the world isn’t perfect and there exists some hijabis who could have that attitude as well as some non-hijabis who look down on covered women. That’s reality unfortunately. I believe that Islam is a religion of pure love. If pure love isn’t shown, then there’s still some work to do for that man or woman. Your comment is so valuable. I’m so glad about your comment dear 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re absolutely correct hijabis like myself have no right to look down upon people who don’t dress like us. In fact judging others and being prideful is not at all hijab it’s goes against the very practice of Islam. And unfortunately as you said there are people who still this and in result giving Islam a bad name. I only pray for their guidance. I wish there were more people like, very kind and open minded. Oh yes this religion is so beautiful and loving.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Hey Noor! I grew up in the Middle East so I have an understanding of the practice and deep respect for the same. It is a matter of faith, personal choice and comfort. One dresses in a manner that makes them most confident in all respects and judging people for that is not the best attitude to carry!
    Furthermore, I have nominated you for the Three Day Quote Challenge 🙂 Hope you accept and I am sure you’ll enjoy it! For details, follow the link below!

    https://source413.wordpress.com/2016/01/22/three-day-quote-challenge-day-2-2/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello Swetha, you’re absolutely right. it’s a personal choice and comfort that determines this decision. it’s my pleasure to be a nominee in that challenge. I’ll have a look at it tomorrow inshaa Allah. it’s mid night where I am. 💜

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I don’t really notice women any differently who wear a hijab here in Canada.

    Now, I have seen women here in Canada wear a burqa..to me, it just adds an aura of mystery about the woman. It doesn’t demonstrate to me, religiosity. It doesn’t easily help promote understanding in very multicultural societies like Canada.

    I’m not religious..but showing part of one’s face to me. is facing God and all of humanity. I have friends who are quietly Christian and live their lives open in heart and face.

    I have a close Mennonite friend who wears a white netted cap over her hair bun, always wears knee length dresses, dark pantyhose, etc. I was raised in southern Ontario in a city with German-Mennonite historical roots. For certain, the acceptance of Mennonites is just easier and vice versa, when the faces are open to all. Every facial expression is less likely to be misunderstood.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree. Facial expressions are easily misunderstood when covered. It’s a good thing though that covering one’s head doesn’t make you feel different about them.
      Burqa’a after all is a cultural thing. It ain’t religious. However, if it makes a woman feel closer to God then it’s her call. I support any act that makes one feel more connected spiritually as long as it doesn’t harm others in any way.

      Like

  8. Because the eyes are the window to the soul, I see all the emotions a soul goes through. This vivid imagination of mine often gives me some deep, inspiring, peaceful, or painful backdrop to that woman’s life… So, I suppose I see mystery willing to be revealed, if respected at the onset…

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Why thank you and absolutely I am, Noor! I see everything from religious practices; to prejudices one could be subjected to; to feminine beauty. Men are visual creatures by nature so when that’s taken away, so is the weaknesses of the flesh. I’m forced to wonder or dig for who that person is on the purest of levels for us both.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Well, I don’t generally get to see much traditional religious clothing being worn in my small community here in the countryside of the Southeast US, but I am happy for those who freely and openly wear that which they feel obligated. I feel proud of myself when I wear a kippa (as known as a “yarmulke” in the Yiddish language) and my red string bracelet in public. They identify me as a person who is subject to and humbled before Hashem, and working in his service. The way I cover my head is similar to the purpose of the burqa in its purpose of revealing an attempt at modesty and humility.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello Jacob, thanks for following my blog. I wrote a long reply in response to yours in your own post twice but it wouldn’t go published. I don’t know why. Anyway, I’ll try to publish it later and go back to your blog and read more of your posts. Regards,

      Like

      1. Oh um it requires approval because I was getting some spam link but I’ll take care of that, no worries. Sorry about all of that. I’ll check it out now.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. It’s brave of you to ask this question…I give you credit for that.
    I have seen women in various states of cover…my sister-in-law choses to cover completely for instance, while my other sister wears color coordinated scarves. So, I would posit that the question is not so much, “What do you think?” as “What should it matter what you think?” It should be a woman’s personal, spiritual, and/or completely feminist choice, that is to say, not influenced by males.

    Brava, Noor! Thanks for getting folks thinking!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks a lot Kennedy for your comment. And you’re right, it should be how could that matter. People usually get afraid of things they don’t know about. Covered women who look kinda unapproachable could spread that feeling too. Some hijabis too, especially if their English wasn’t that good to communicate. They would prefer to stay away out of shyness or fear of being misunderstood, or both.
      It’s about time that people get more open to one another and speak!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I feel she is being punished for being born female. I know someone who escaped from it. I know the inside stories. It’s a tragedy. We live in the 21st century when all is said and done.

    Like

    1. Those stories you heard can be right or overrated. I believe in true freedom. If a female wants to wear it because she feels more spiritually connected to God, then why not.
      If it’s enforced on her, then that’s a big No No.

      Like

  12. Now I hear that yesterday some women in Syria were sentenced to 50 lashes each for not wearing sharia approved clothing. Those who impose such unjust penalties and ruin people’s lives should hang their heads in shame. It is also high time the Saudi blogger was released and allowed to join his wife and children in Canada.

    Like

    1. Hi Harry, thanks for your comment. I don’t understand the connection between your examples and Burqa’a. Burqaa has nothing to do with that. Burqaa is only a piece of cloth which should represent faith. Most of the time, it is worn as a choice by the woman herself.

      Like

  13. What an excellent idea for a discussion!

    I’ve seen women in burqa’as many times, and at this point I hardly even notice it. However, the first few times I saw women fully covered from head to toe in black robes (I’m not sure what that dress is called) it caught my attention. I had never seen anyone dressed like that before, and I was curious about what the reasons were behind it. In fact I’m still rather curious about it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Josh for stopping by! Reasons for covering a woman’s face can vary. However, some people believe it’s part of religion. It shows complete devotion to God by being busy with only her husband, family and relatives where she can uncover her whole head in front of (that includes father, brother, son, uncles, father in law). This is however is argument-able. Muslim women have different ways to show devotion to God, this can be one of them, but most women do it’s mostly because it is a society thing. Covering someone’s face isn’t really a religious act to many Muslim scholars. Some though believe that it is, and that women should fully cover. So people have different beliefs.
      The idea is when people get used to doing something, it’s hard for some of them to quit.

      Like

      1. Thanks for the explanation! You’re right about the whole habit thing. We get used to doing what those around us do, and ingrained patterns of behavior are hard to change. But to me the practice of covering one’s face seems fairly benign, as long as a woman freely chooses to do so. I’m sure there are some people who disagree with me, but I’m hesitant to strongly criticize cultural traditions that I know nothing about.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. This touched me a lot. I’m Nigerian, and not a muslim, in some parts of Nigeria, people hardly get close to them.
    I do have lots of muslim relatives and friends.
    Some of them wear the burqa’ or niqab (I’m not sure which is correct) but it doesnt stop me from being close to them, their hearts matters. And infact they are really cool. I don’t think people should be judged by how they dress and by the way, these are the ‘most’ decently dressed people.

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  15. Yes have seen a couple in bourka.I has in my work more than 12 different nationalté but a woman in bourka and in black gives me not a good feeling.You can ‘t see what people it is..under that cloud. That can be all of people..If i talk with a person i will see in their eyes but that is te difficult and when it is warm I think at this woman.This is .not so healty ..and the man are walking over the street in short leaves ..For me all the people are the same insides and i have what muslim woman as friend not with a bourka and they are good woman.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello thanks for stopping by. I agree with you. Warning burqaa prevents one from seeing the other person facial features and body language easier and thus communication becomes more difficult.
      I also believe that goodness is quality given to people regardless of religion or clothes.

      Like

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